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For at least a thousand years, the head-covering served to signify the wearer’s marital status. The symbolic headdress for a maiden was a wreath or crown (vainags). In Liv regions, a ribbon served for the same purpose. Thus, you could say that all unmarried women were princesses in their own right. It was unseemly for a married woman to go out bareheaded. On festive occasions, married women used to wear a head-cloth, a practice that continued throughout the 18th and 19th centuries. During this period, various types of women’s hats were worn. For daily wear, married and un- married women favoured homespun linen or woollen scarves. At the end of the 18th century, commercially manufactured silk scarves became a fashionable part of the national costume; they were worn on the head, over a hat, or around the shoulders. In the making of the headdress, various manufactured materials were used: glass beads, lace, and fabric.

Latvian designer Capsis makes reproduction style ethnographic crowns from all regions of Latvia. Each distinctive design and colours are reflective of the region they come from – Kurzeme, Vidzeme and Latgale. Capsis can create a crown for you in any size and style.